sábado, 3 de dezembro de 2016

Best Winter Escapes in the United States

 

nationalgeographic.com

 

 

aurora-winter-train-alaska.adapt.1190.1

By Gulnaz Khan

 

We found a trip for every type of winter wanderer.

Take a train through Alaska’s winter wonderland

The Alaska Railroad operates year-round, connecting Anchorage and Fairbanks. Watch landscapes drenched in ivory, sapphire blue skies, and wild moose glide past your large windows from the warmth of the Aurora Winter Train. Spend a night in Fairbanks under the emerald glow of the aurora borealis, or get your adrenaline going in Anchorage with endless options for ice climbing, cross-country skiing, and dogsledding.

MUST-SEE: Stop at the Aurora Ice Museum in Fairbanks, the world’s largest year-round ice environment, created from more than a thousand tons of snow. Don a complimentary parka and head to the bar for an appletini served in an ice glass.

WHERE TO STAY: Get off the beaten path at the remote Winterlake Lodge on the Iditarod National Historic Trail, where visitors fly over ice-glazed peaks and glittering lakes to reach a 15-acre adventurer's paradise.

FUN FACT: Auroras make weird noises—spectators often report the sounds of crackling and hissing during powerful displays.

Road-trip down Oregon’s scenic coast

Elk graze at sunrise in Ecola State Park.

Photograph by Craig Tuttle, Getty Images

One of Oregon’s Seven Wonders, this 363-mile stretch of coastline is punctuated by moody landscapes, towering waves, craggy headlands, and spectacular winter storms. There’s no shortage of stops on the scenic route from Astoria to Brookings—explore quirky coastal communities, spot sea lions at Shore Acres State Park, watch dancing jellyfish at the Oregon Coast Aquarium, and explore 79 state parks.

MUST-SEE: The nine-mile stretch of coast in Ecola State Park offers stunning views of stacked coastal mountains, sweeping shorelines, and crashing waves. The park’s Indian Beach was the filming location of La Push beach in the Twilight movies.

WHAT TO EAT: Stop at the Tillamook Cheese Factory—the largest cheese factory in the world—for locally produced treats, including gooey grilled cheese and homemade fudge. Stop at Pelican Brewing Company for a local brew with a view.

FUN FACT: Astoria, the launching point for your four-wheeled journey, is the oldest American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains.

Colorful lights illuminate San Antonio's River Walk.

Photograph by Robbie George, National Geographic Creative

Enjoy the light show in San Antonio, Texas

Starting at the end of November, millions of twinkling lights illuminate the San Antonio River Walk in a dazzling display. Riverboats carrying an eclectic mix of bell choirs, folk groups, and Latino ensembles fill the air with carols every evening from November 30 to December 18.

MUST-SEE: When you’re not browsing cozy cafés and shops along the cypress-lined River Walk, explore south-central Texas’ rich colonial heritage at the 18th-century San Antonio Missions, the first UNESCO World Heritage site in the state.

WHAT TO EAT: Indulge in San Antonio’s famous Tex-Mex cuisine, savor a charcuterie plate at Cured, or splurge on a whopping 10-course culinary adventure at Mixtli Mexican Culinaria.

FUN FACT: In 2014 Amazon named San Antonio the most romantic city in the United States based on the city’s purchases of romance novels, relationship books, romantic movies, and music.

Witness history in the making in Washington, D.C.

People crowd the National Mall during President Barack Obama's inauguration in 2013.

Photograph by rypson, Getty Images

On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States, will be sworn into office on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol, and there’s no better place to watch this historic event than Washington, D.C. Giant video screens and speakers will stream Inauguration Day proceedings to thousands of spectators against the monument-dotted National Mall. Afterward, line up on Pennsylvania Avenue to watch the inaugural procession march to the White House.

MUST-SEE: The Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture showcases more than 400 years of artifacts that reveal the African-American experience.

WHERE TO STAY: Stay in the middle of the action at the W Hotel Washington D.C. Grab a drink at the swanky POV rooftop lounge overlooking the Washington Monument, savor Mediterranean flavors in the artfully styled Pinea restaurant, or get a "skin-auguration" at Bliss Spa. The hotel is also just steps from the Smithsonian, International Spy Museum, and Lincoln Memorial.

FUN FACT: William McKinley’s 1897 inauguration was the first recorded by a motion picture camera, and in 1997, Bill Clinton’s was the first to be broadcast live on the Internet.

Sundance and stargaze in Park City, Utah

Snow blankets the rainbow dwellings of Park City, Utah.

Photograph by Tom Kelly, Getty Images

Every January, thousands of filmmakers, directors, and Hollywood hotshots flock to the sugary slopes of Utah for the Sundance Film Festival, the largest independent film festival in the United States. Even if you don’t manage to snag highly coveted movie passes, Park City offers plenty to do. Stargaze for celebrities in the lively bars, quaint shops, and eclectic galleries lining the historic Main Street, or get lost in the gorgeous mountains with some exhilarating winter sports.

MUST-SEE: While everyone is sitting in darkened theaters, hit the low-traffic slopes at the posh Deer Valley Ski Resort.

WHAT TO EAT: Stop at the kitschy dive bar No Name Saloon and Grill on Main Street for a game of shuffleboard and some buffalo sliders.

FUN FACT: Sundance wasn’t always held in Park City—neighboring Salt Lake City hosted the festival for its first three years.

Lanterns line the outdoor spa pool at the Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort and Spa.

Photograph by Design Pics Inc./Alamy Stock Photo

Soak in New Mexico’s natural hot springs

With more than 300 days of sunshine a year, five national forests, and 17 national parks and monuments, New Mexico is an oasis of outdoor adventure. At the end of the day of activity, loosen up your muscles in soothing geothermal mineral springs, or indulge in Native American-inspired spa treatments. Fifty miles south of Santa Fe, soak in rejuvenating waters of Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort and Spa while surrounded by high desert mesas, lush river valley, and miles of trails.

MUST-SEE: Just 45 minutes north of Ojo is Taos Pueblo, a UNESCO World Heritage site and National Historic Landmark. The adobe settlement has been continuously inhabited for more than a thousand years.

WHERE TO STAY: In addition to Ojo Caliente, consider staying in the small resort town of Truth or Consequences two hours from Albuquerque, which boasts 10 commercial bathhouses.

FUN FACT: More than 100,000 gallons of water bubble to the surface of Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs per day.

Whale-watch on the island paradise of Hawaii

A humpback whale jumps out of the waters surrounding Kauai, Hawaii.

Photograph by George Karbus, Getty Images

Between December and May humpback whales migrate to the Hawaiian islands, where they breed and nurse their young in the warm, shallow waters. Escape the cold and go on a sunny winter getaway during peak season from January to March. The Auau Channel between West Maui, Lanai, and Molokai is one of best viewing spots in the world. While Maui is a top whale-watching destination, cruises are available at most harbors around the state.

MUST-SEE: When you're not sailing Hawaii's crystal waters, visit the otherworldly Haleakalā National Park. A twisting road leads up to the 10,023-foot summit area, where the breathtaking Haleakalā Crater will have you feeling like you’re on a different planet.

WHERE TO EAT: Indulge in the island's freshest seafood at Merriman’s, where 90 percent of the menu is locally sourced. The food is just as spectacular as the oceanfront view on the striking Kapalua Bay.

FUN FACT: Hawaii’s whale-watching industry generates approximately $20 million in total revenue per year.

Discover the Navajo Nation in Arizona

A Navajo trail guide navigates the Canyon de Chelly National Monument on horseback.

Photograph by Kevin Moloney, New York Times/Redux

The Navajo Nation extends 27,000 square miles into Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, where the legacy of the Anasazi people echoes throughout tribal parks, national monuments, and museums. Visit the majestic canyons of the Navajo National Monument, where prehistoric sandstone villages are carved into the alcoves and decorated with rock art. Head southeast to the Canyon de Chelly National Monument, one of the largest archaeological preserves in the U.S., to see Indian ruins dating from 2500 B.C.

MUST-SEE: The Navajo Interactive Museum in Tuba City was created with the guidance of leading Navajo scholars and artists and showcases the history of the Navajo people, spanning from ancient times to World War II.

WHERE TO SHOP: Hopi and Navajo artisans sell rugs, jewelry, baskets, kachina dolls, and turquoise at the Hubbell Trading Post, the oldest operating trading post on the Navajo Nation.

FUN FACT: In 1882 archaeologists found mummies in Canyon de Chelly.

Celebrate New Year’s with the mummers in Philadelphia

Brightly costumed members of the Aqua String Band perform during the 2016 Mummers Parade in Philadelphia.

Photograph by Joseph Kaczmarek, AP Photo

On New Year's Day, thousands of brightly costumed revelers take to the streets of Philadelphia for the annual Mummers Parade, the oldest continuous folk parade in the United States. The word "mummer" is rooted in the Old French word momeur—meaning miming, masking, and folk play. Thousands of people line the streets of the City of Brotherly Love from JFK Boulevard down Broad Street to watch the mummers flood the city in an explosion of color, music, and dance.

MUST-SEE: The Philadelphia Museum of Art houses a world-renowned collection, boasting artistic and architectural works from around the globe. Walk behind the museum to catch a glimpse of the glittering Boathouse Row—19th-century boathouses lining the Schuylkill River.

WHAT TO EAT: Sink your teeth into the perfect steak at Butcher and Singer, savor some ceviche at Alma de Cuba, or sample a variety of Amish specialties and handmade confections at Reading Terminal Market.

FUN FACT: During the 17th and 18th centuries, people carried their muskets and pistols to the parade and fired them into the air during the mummers celebration.

Marvel at winter wildlife in Yellowstone

American bison roam Yellowstone National Park's frosty landscape.

Photograph by Tim Fitzharris, Minden Pictures

Visit Yellowstone National Park’s steaming geysers, plunging canyons, and dramatic landscapes without the crowds. Elk, bison, and coyotes wander the park’s quiet winter valleys, easily spotted against the wintry scene. Learn about the reintroduction of the elusive gray wolf into Yellowstone and its explore its iconic vistas.

MUST-SEE: Old Faithful is one of Yellowstone’s most celebrated sites, and a photographer’s paradise. Treat your lens to dense evergreens, colorful mineral pools, and frost-coated bison.

WHERE TO STAY: Reduce your travel planning anxiety and book a trip with National Geographic Expeditions, in which a wildlife expert guides you through Yellowstone’s fascinating ecosystem.

FUN FACT: Yellowstone, established in 1872, is the world’s first national park.

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